Quick Answer: How Do You Say OK In British Slang?

Why do Brits say ta?

5 Answers.

Online Etymology Dictionary says: ta: 1772, “natural infantile sound of gratitude” [Weekley].

Although possibly originating from the imitative of baby talk, this is in widespread use in the North of England and Wales as an informal “thanks” amongst adults..

Does bloody mean the F word?

The word “bloody” is the expletive derived from shortening the expression “by our Lady” (i.e., Mary, mother of Christ). As such, it represents the invocation of a blasphemous oath.

How do British say hello?

hi’Hello’ and ‘hi’ are common casual greetings in England, and here is a list of other informal ways to greet people. These are ones you shouldn’t use when visiting the Queen, for instance! 1. Hi there: A more formal version of “Hi”.

What does brilliant mean in British slang?

‘Brilliant’ is not a word exclusively in the British lexicon, but has a very British usage. Specifically, when something is exciting or wonderful, particularly when something is good news, ‘brilliant’ can mean as such. For example, ‘You got the job? Oh, mate, that’s brilliant.

What is a Wally in British slang?

Word forms: plural wallies. countable noun. If you refer to someone as a wally, you think that they are stupid or foolish. [British, informal, disapproval]

How do you say great in British slang?

– Ace is a British slang term meaning excellent. It is mostly used in Liverpool. In the rest of the UK, Brits use the term “Brilliant”.

What does geezer mean in UK?

Geezer is a slang term for a man. In the UK it is used most often to refer simply to a man ie “some geezer was here earlier” and less often as complimentary phrase ie “he is a proper geezer”.

Why do British say proper?

Proper (adj) Proper is a difficult word to define, mainly because British people use it to describe soo many different things. Doing things ‘properly’ means to do them correctly or in the right way. In the North of England, ‘proper’ can also be used for emphasis in the same way as the word ‘very’.

Is Bloody a bad word in the UK?

Still, to Americans bloody remains the quintessential British swear word, and one of the only ones they have not adopted themselves (except when they’re being pretentious or ironic). Both countries share a fascination with swear words’ that reference the male anatomy.

What does Tosh mean?

: sheer nonsense : bosh.

What are some UK slang words?

50 Must-Know British Slang Words and PhrasesBloke. “Bloke” would be the American English equivalent of “dude.” It means a “man.”Lad. In the same vein as “bloke,” “lad” is used, however, for boys and younger men.Bonkers. … Daft. … To leg it. … Trollied / Plastered. … Quid. … Dodgy.More items…•

Why do British say bloody?

Don’t worry, it’s not a violent word… it has nothing to do with “blood”.”Bloody” is a common word to give more emphasis to the sentence, mostly used as an exclamation of surprise. Something may be “bloody marvellous” or “bloody awful“. Having said that, British people do sometimes use it when expressing anger…

What is slang for a British person?

Brit. Brit is a commonly used term in the United States and elsewhere, simply as a shortened form of “Briton”.

What do they call a fart in England?

Fittingly, “chuffed” is also British slang for “farted.”

What is a very British thing to say?

I’m knackered – I’m tired. Cheeky – Mischievous or playful. Bloody – This is a very British thing to say – meaning very. I’m pissed – Not meaning the regular “angry”, in British talk it actually means you’re very drunk and is used quite a lot when you are out drinking with friends.

Is Frick a bad word?

Frick isn’t a swear word. I know there are certain individuals who think c r a p is a swear word (even though it really isn’t), but “frick” isn’t a swear word by any sense of the meaning of “swear word”. No one is going to get offended by someone saying “frick”.

How do Brits say thank you?

In other parts of the English-speaking world, “cheers” is what you say when you clink glasses of alcohol drink together, but it’s also one of the most popular colloquial ways of saying thank you in England. Again, you’re likely to hear people say “Cheers, mate!”